Swansea.com Stadium
(Swansea City)

Address: Plasmarl,
Landore,
Swansea,
Wales,
SA1 2FA

Capacity: 21,088 (All-Seater)

Swansea City

An excellent ground that has allowed its tenants to take a big step into 21st century football.

Formerly known as the White Rock Stadium, the Liberty Stadium has been home to Swansea City Football Club and rugby union team Ospreys since first opening.
Swansea City moved here having previously been based at the Vetch Field since 1912 which had deteriorated over time. A proposal for a bowl-shaped venue on the site of a former athletics stadium was submitted by Swansea Council and a developer-led consortium.
Work on the site began in 2003 and the new stadium was officially opened on 10th July 2005, with Swansea City first playing there in a friendly against Fulham on 23rd July that finished 1-1.

The original White Rock Stadium name came after the copper works which previously existed on the site where the stadium is based. The name was only in use during construction however and upon opening the search for a new name began.
Swansea-based developers Liberty Properties Plc won the naming rights on 18th October 2005, and the Liberty Stadium name remained in use until August 2021, when the stadium's current name came into use.

Location and Getting There

The Swansea.com Stadium is based in the Landore area of Swansea, around two miles north of Swansea City Centre. The River Tawe runs directly past the stadium’s eastern side, and the Morfa Shopping Park is a slightly further away to the east from there.

The simplest method of reaching the Swansea.com Stadium is by car.
There are large car parks outside the stadium’s northern and western sides, though these are for permit holders only. Plenty of the streets immediately surrounding the stadium also have ‘Residents Only’ parking schemes in place.
The Morfa Shopping Park directly to the east of the Swansea.com Stadium has a parking time limit of 90 minutes. You are therefore very likely to end up with a parking fine if you park here for the duration of the match.
The recommendation for parking is to therefore head further north or further south of the Swansea.com Stadium. If travelling to the stadium via the M4, Swansea City recommend making use of the Park and Ride facility at the Felindre Old Steelworks, located shortly off Junction 46. It costs £10 per car and includes a transport directly to the stadium by bus.
Further south, it is possible to find legal street parking closer to Swansea’s City Centre, and the walk from here to the stadium takes around 10-15 minutes.

Swansea Station, served by Transport for Wales and Great Western Rail, is located near to the City Centre and walking from here to the stadium can take around 25-30 minutes.
If you don’t fancy the walk, the recommendation is to either make use of the Taxi Rank located next to the station, or make use of the 4 or 4A bus service that runs directly to the Swansea.com Stadium.
The taxi fare costs around £7 whilst the bus service costs £2.80 for a single fare or £4.90 for a return fare.

Outside the Stadium

If you are approaching the Swansea.com Stadium from Swansea Station, you will first reach the ground’s South Stand. It is known for sponsorship reasons as the Westacres South Stand.
The exterior here consists of a sandy-coloured brickwork base, white corrugated iron higher up and a white cantilever roof coming down from the top. It is also possible to see the underside of part of the stand’s seating area from outside.
There is a Ticket Office based right in the stadium’s southwest corner, with a box holding matchday programmes based a little away from here to the west.
Turnstiles for the Westacres South Stand (11-18) are based along the brickwork base.
You can also find a small car park in place out beyond the South Stand’s exterior.

A short distance outside the southwest corner is a statue of Ivor Allchurch.
Born in Swansea on 16th October 1929, Allchurch was an inside-forward who played for his hometown club (who were then known as Swansea Town) across two spells between 1947 and 1968. He made over 500 appearances for the club in total, scoring over 100 goals in all competitions. Allchurch also earned 68 caps for Wales, scoring 23 times, and was part of the squad that took part in the 1958 FIFA World Cup in Sweden.
He passed away on 10th July 1997 at the age of 67.

Continuing round in a clockwise direction brings you to the West Stand, know for sponsorship reasons as the Swansea University Stand and the largest of the four at the Swansea.com Stadium.
The exterior here protrudes out much further than anywhere else in the stadium, consisting of a sandy-coloured brickwork base with large white and silver panels and glass windows higher up. The Swansea City badge, Ospreys badge, Swansea.com Stadium logo, Swansea University crest, and City and County of Swansea logos are also on display across the panelled exterior.
At one end of the Swansea University Stand, next to the stadium’s southwest corner, is Swansea City’s and Ospreys’ Club Shop, located under a triangular-shaped roof. Further along the exterior is the entrance to the Swans Hospitality and Supporter Services, whilst the Main Reception Entrance is located in the middle.
There is a Laser and Beauty Clinic based over towards the stadium’s northwest corner, whilst turnstiles leading into the Swansea University Stand (1-10) can be found along the brickwork base. Turnstiles 1-5 are at the northern end of the exterior and Turnstiles 6-10 are at the southern end.
Out beyond the Swansea University Stand’s exterior is one of the stadium’s Main Car Parks which is triangular in shape due to the A4067 being right next to it.

The exterior of the North Stand is the same as the Westacres South Stand opposite. It is known for sponsorship reasons as the Westacres North Stand.
It consists of a sandy-coloured brickwork base with white corrugated iron higher up and a white cantilever roof coming down from the top. It is also possible to see the underside of part of the stand’s seating area from outside.
Turnstiles for the Westacres North Stand are spread across the brickwork base, though it is worth noting that large sections of this stand’s exterior are fenced off. The Westacres North Stand holds the turnstiles for away supporters (31-38) and fences are in place to help with the segregation of home and away fans before they enter the stadium. There is no real need to come round to this side of the stadium unless you have a seat within this stand.
Out beyond the Westacres North Stand’s exterior is the other Main Car Park for the Swansea.com Stadium, as well as the Main Coach Park.

The East Stand shares the same exterior design as the adjacent North and South Stands, the main difference being that it is longer as this stand runs along the length of the pitch rather than its width. It is known for sponsorship reasons as the Trade Centre Wales Stand.
The exterior consists of a sandy-coloured brickwork base with white corrugated iron higher up and the white cantilever roof coming down from the top. It is also possible to see the underside of part of the stand’s seating area from outside.
Turnstiles into the Trade Centre Wales Stand (19-30) are spread across the brickwork base and are easy to access. Turnstiles 25-30 are at the northern end of the exterior and Turnstiles 19-24 are at the southern end of the exterior.
The River Tawe runs along past the Trade Centre Wales Stand and you can get closer to it via a lower down path.

Inside the Stadium

The Westacres South Stand is split into two tiers that you can easily get between. The space between the two tiers additionally contains flat platforms for disabled supporters to use.
The lower tier is smaller than the upper tier and consists of black seating with the letters SWANS spelt out in white across the central blocks.
The upper tier consists of black and white seating that forms a wave-like pattern, with the bottom part coloured black and the upper part coloured white.
Both the stadium’s southwest and southeast corners continue this wave-like pattern, but do not have a lower tier, instead containing an opening for ambulance access.
You can find a small electronic scoreboard hanging from the Westacres South Stand’s roof which is best visible to those at the opposite end of the Swansea.com Stadium.
Your view from anywhere inside the Westacres South Stand and its adjacent corners is perfectly clear as there are no supporting pillars coming down from the cantilever roof, and the stadium’s enclosed design means that every row is fully protected from the sides and behind as well.

The Swansea University Stand is slightly taller than the rest of the Swansea.com Stadium and split into two tiers that you can easily get between. The space between the two tiers additionally contains flat platforms for disabled supporters to use.
Every seat in the smaller lower tier is coloured black, whilst most of the blocks in the upper tier continue the black and white wave pattern that is present in other parts of the stadium. The exception here comes with the central blocks which are coloured black and dedicated to executives, and this executive seating blocks are present in the middle of the lower tier as well.
At the very back of the Swansea University Stand, behind the gantry holding the matchday camera, is a row of executive boxes, whilst right down at the front are the stadium’s dugouts and tunnel, with the changing rooms based inside.
Flat platforms for disabled supporters are located at the front of most of the lower tiers seating blocks.
The Swansea.com Stadium’s Control Box is located up at the back of the stand, next to the southwest corner, and at the opposite end of the stand next to the northwest corner is the Swansea.com Stadium’s TV Studio.
Your view from anywhere inside the Swansea University Stand is perfectly clear as there are no supporting pillars coming down from the cantilever roof, and the stadium’s enclosed design means that every row is fully protected from the sides and behind as well.

The Westacres North Stand is almost an exact carbon-copy of the Westacres South Stand opposite.
It is split into two tiers that you can easily get between. The space between the two tiers additionally contains flat platforms for disabled supporters to use.
The lower tier consists of mostly black seating, but in contrast to the Westacres South Stand has the letters OSPREYS spelt out in white across the central blocks.
The upper tier makes use of a black and white wave-like pattern, with the bottom part coloured black and the upper part coloured white.
Like at the opposite side of the stadium, both the northwest and northeast corners only have an upper tier of seating, with an opening for ambulance access located underneath.
There is also an electronic scoreboard hanging from the roof which can be best seen by those at the opposite end of the Swansea.com Stadium.
Your view from anywhere inside the Westacres North Stand is perfectly clear because of the cantilever roof above, and the stadium’s enclosed design means that every row is fully protected from the sides and behind as well.

The Trade Centre Wales Stand is the same height as the adjacent Westacres North and Westacres South Stands, split into two tiers that you can easily get between. The space between the two tiers additionally contains flat platforms for disabled supporters to use.
The seating blocks in this stand do not continue the wave-like pattern however, instead being coloured almost entirely black. The letters SWANSEA are spelt out in white across the larger upper tier, and the letters ABERTAWE (Swansea in Welsh) are spelt out in white across the smaller lower tier. Most of the lower tier seating blocks additionally have a flat platform at the front for disabled supporters to use.
The central block in the upper tier has seating missing up towards the back, as it is up there that a secondary matchday camera is sometimes put in place.
Your view from anywhere inside the Trade Centre Wales Stand is perfectly clear because of the cantilever roof above, and the stadium’s enclosed design means that every row is fully protected from the sides and behind as well.

Away Fans

Away fans are located behind the goal in the Westacres North Stand.
Smaller crowds will typically be allocated the central blocks in the upper tier, and larger crowds will take up more of the upper tier and the whole of the stand’s lower tier, with stewards and large sheets used to segregate this away following from any home fans nearby. Flat platforms for disabled supporters to use are also available in the space between the stand’s upper and lower tier.

The stand offers a perfectly clear view of the pitch and is very well protected by the stadium’s enclosed shape.
Outside, the turnstiles are in a fenced off area which only away supporters are allowed to enter.
Accessibility both inside and out of this away section is excellent and the experience on offer inside is very good as well.

Matchday Pubs

Pubs available to supporters on a matchday include:
-The Bank Statement (57-58 Wind Street, SA1 1EP) (A JD Wetherspoon Pub, Typically Home and Away Supporters) (Located near Swansea City Centre)

-The Globe (Mysydd Road, SA1 2QD) (Typically Home and Away Supporters)

-The Griffin (Wind Street, SA1 1DW) (Typically Home and Away Supporters) (Located near Swansea City Centre)

-Harvester (Plasmarl, SA1 2FB) (Away Supporters Welcome) (Located very close to the Swansea.com Stadium)

-The No Sign Wine Bar (56 Wind Street, SA1 1EG) (Typically Home and Away Supporters) (Located near Swansea City Centre)

-The Plough and Harrow (314 Llangyfelach Road, SA5 9LG) (Away Supporters Welcome)

Overview

The Swansea.com Stadium truly is a venue fit for the modern game.
A well-balanced, enclosed venue with perfectly clear views from every seat and very good accessibility for all fans, this is a stadium that you cannot pick any major faults in.

The memories of Vetch Field will never leave the minds of Swansea City fans, and there are likely to be many more to come at their newer home in Landore. This is a football ground well worth checking out.

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