Wembley Stadium

Address: Wembley Stadium,

Wembley,

Greater London,

England,

HA9 0WS

Capacity: 90,000 (All-Seater)

Wembley Stadium.jpg

The place millions dream of playing at, and millions dream of going to.

The history of Wembley Stadium is long and prestigious. The venue you can find in place today is actually the second version of Wembley, with the original being based on the same site between 1923 and 2003.

Originally known as the Empire Stadium, the original Wembley Stadium had an oval shape and was recognisable through its distinctive twin towers on one side.

The stadium hosted England games until the year 2000, hosted UEFA European Cup Finals in 1963, 1968, 1971, 1978 and 1992, hosted nine games at the 1966 FIFA World Cup including the Final, and hosted six games at UEFA Euro 1996 including the Final.

There were rugby league, rugby union, speedway, stock car racing, greyhound racing, American football and Gaelic football events also held here amongst other sports, with Wembley Stadium being treated as the central venue for the 1948 Summer Olympics in London.

After more than 70 years of being at the heart of English sport, Wembley Stadium was set to be reconstructed. The final football game played there was a match between England and Germany on 7th October 2000, with the visitors winning 1-0. The stadium was closed that same day, and the plan was for demolition to begin around Christmas 2000 with construction fully complete by 2003.

A succession of financial and legal difficulties caused significant delays to those plans however, and it wasn’t until September 2002 that demolition of the original Wembley Stadium began.

The whole construction process took longer than hoped, including notable issues with the stadium’s most distinctive feature. There were hopes that the new Wembley would be ready for the 2006 FA Cup Final, but construction remained unfinished, and the final continued to be played at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, the venue that had been in use following the original Wembley’s closure in 2000.

Eventually, more than four and a half years after the project first began, Wembley Stadium was officially opened with the FA Cup Final on Saturday 19th May 2007. It saw Chelsea beat Manchester United 1-0 in front of 89,826 people.

Much like its predecessor, Wembley Stadium has become the regular home of the England National Team.

Being the country’s largest and most high-profile venue, it also used for many significant events in the English sporting calendar. The League Cup Final, Football League Trophy Final, FA Cup Semi-Finals, FA Cup Final, Women’s FA Cup Final, FA Vase Final, FA Trophy Final, Football League Play-Off Finals, National League Play-Off Finals, Rugby League Challenge Cup Final, FA Community Shield and Women’s FA Community Shield are all held here on an annual basis.

The UEFA Champions League Final in both 2011 and 2013 has also been held here, with the 2024 edition also set to take place at Wembley Stadium.

At UEFA Euro 2020, Wembley Stadium played host to eight games in total, including both Semi-Final games and the Final.

Between 2016 and 2019, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club made use of Wembley Stadium for matches, initially in just UEFA Competitions and then in all competitions whilst they awaited construction of the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium to be complete.

Many sports aside from association football and rugby league have also been held at England’s national stadium, with the venue becoming the first in Europe to host a National Football League game in October 2007. The New York Giants defeated the Miami Dolphins 13-10 in front of 81,176 people.

Location and Getting There

Wembley Stadium, branded as ‘Wembley Stadium connected by EE’ through sponsorship, takes its name from the area it is located in, around eight miles northwest of the Centre of London.

The stadium is based within Wembley Park, part of the London Borough of Brent, with surrounding areas and districts including Kingsbury to the north, Cricklewood to the east, Park Royal to the south, and Wembley itself to the west.

The stadium’s location within London and the design of Wembley Park means that this is a place easy to reach via public transport. You can come to Wembley by car if you so wish, but it is generally discouraged.

Official stadium parking places require booking in advance and aren’t really located that close to the stadium itself. Resident-only parking schemes in the surrounding area prevent you from parking on the nearby streets as well.

Wembley Stadium is served by three local stations: Wembley Park, Wembley Stadium and Wembley Central.

 

Wembley Park is a London Underground station served by the Jubilee and Metropolitan Lines. It is located directly north of the stadium and the walk from here takes around 10-15 minutes depending on which stand you need to head to. The route is incredibly simple. After exiting the station onto Bridge Road (A4089), you head south and under the Bobby Moore Bridge, leading onto the famous Wembley Way that goes right up to the stadium. The route heads up a ramp the closer you get to Wembley Stadium, and is considered a very popular and well-known route that thousands of fans head down on a matchday.

Wembley Stadium Station is a National Rail station. It is served by Chiltern Railways which runs between London Marylebone and High Wycombe. Wembley Stadium Station is the closest of the three to Wembley Stadium itself, less than 0.5 miles away to the southwest. The route is a very simple one that heads across White Horse Square and onto South Way (B4557) which leads across to the stadium’s exterior. It takes between 5 and 10 minutes depending on how quickly you go.

Wembley Central is based more within the area named Wembley. It is served by Southern Rail, West Midlands Trains and the London Overground, located less than one mile southwest of Wembley Stadium itself. The route from station to stadium takes you first along High Road (A404) , eventually turning left onto Wembley Hill Road (A479), past Wembley Stadium Station, across White Horse Square and onto South Way (B4557) which leads across to the stadium’s exterior. It takes around 15-20 minutes depending on how quickly you go.

 

Any of the three stations around Wembley Stadium can be used on a matchday, though Wembley Park chooses to be the most popular because of its location and the fact that it allows fans to walk down the famous Wembley Way before reaching the exterior.

In terms of buses, Wembley Stadium is served by many local services including the 18, N18, 83, N83, 92, 182, 206, 223, 297 and 483 which go between northwest and central London.

Licensed taxi cabs are of course also available, though expect them to be expensive.

Outside the Stadium

The iconic Wembley Way, which is actually officially known as the Olympic Way, leads up to Wembley Stadium from the northern end of Wembley Park. As you get closer to the stadium, ramps enable you to head higher up and off the ground beneath. This is necessary as the space underneath the stadium’s outer concourse is used by vehicles.

Heading up this ramp, you are given the option of heading either left or right to get up to the very highest level of the outer concourse (which way you go will normally depend on where in the stadium you are going to be based). Directly in front of you is the North Stand.

What’s important to note from here on is that Wembley Stadium’s interior can be divided into five main levels. Levels 1 and 5 are the ones used by regular supporters on a matchday. Levels 2, 3 and 4 are for Club Wembley members, with Levels 3 and 4 containing executive boxes.

The exterior of Wembley Stadium has 14 gates in total, beginning with the letter A and running around the stadium in an anti-clockwise direction. Each gate is either for Level 1 access or Level 5 access, with the exterior also having three Club Wembley Entrances.

The exterior of the North Stand has a very eye-catching design, consisting mostly of a glass façade that uses white pillars lower down to hold its upper parts in place. The glass panels towards the top often project out images relating to the fixture or event taking place that day, and they can be seen from right at the far end of Wembley Way. Within the centre of this glass façade is the Club Wembley North Entrance, leading to the Bobby Moore Room inside.

The North Stand Entrance is also in use for the UCFB Wembley Campus. UCFB (University Campus of Football Business) is a higher education institution which offers degrees in the football, sports and events industry. Wembley Stadium holds the institution’s southern campus, with the northern campus being based at the City of Manchester Stadium since 2016. Further campuses have been announced in Australia and North America.

On the concourse outside this North Entrance is a giant statue of Sir Bobby Moore.

Born in Barking, Essex on 12th April 1941, Bobby Moore is regarded as one of the finest defenders in football history. He came through at West Ham United, playing nearly 650 times for the club between 1958 and 1974. He would play nearly 150 times for Fulham between 1974 and 1977 and went on to have brief spells at the San Antonio Thunder, Seattle Sounders and Carolina Lightnin’ in the USA, as well as Herning Fremad in Denmark (who are now known as FC Midtjylland). A short spell in management came during the 1980s when he took charge of Oxford City, Southend United, and Hong Kong club Eastern Athletic Association. His time in club football included winning the 1964 FA Cup, 1964 FA Charity Shield, and 1965 UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup whilst with West Ham United.

What cements Sir Bobby Moore’s iconic status with many however is his time with England. Capped 108 times by his country, scoring two senior international goals, Moore is well-known for being the captain of the England team which won the 1966 FIFA World Cup on home soil. His two senior international goals came in friendlies against Poland and Norway earlier in that year.

Globally respected for his ability and leadership, Sir Bobby Moore passed away on the 24th February 1993 at the age of 51. The statue of him outside Wembley Stadium was unveiled on 11th May 2007, eight days before Wembley officially opened with the 2007 FA Cup Final. It depicts with his foot on top of a ball and looking out towards Wembley Way and beyond.

Heading round in a clockwise direction from the North Stand brings you to the northeast corner.

Its exterior continues the mostly glass façade with white supporting pillars lower down to hold its upper parts in place. This side of Wembley Stadium holds Gate G (A Level 1 Gate) and is considered part of the Green Zone which stretches round from the Club Wembley North Entrance to the centre of the stadium’s East Stand.

Out beyond the northeast corner and the outer concourse is the stadium’s Yellow Car Park, located off Engineers Way.

Heading round past the northwest corner brings you close to what is Wembley Stadium’s most distinctive feature.

Wembley has become recognisable worldwide through its giant lattice arch, seven metres wide, 133 metres high, 315 metres long, and held in place around 22° off true. It is designed to support the weight of all of the stadium’s northern roof and around 60% of the retractable southern roof. It is the world’s longest unsupported roof structure, with its off-true angle designed to help support the heavy stadium roof through cables that prevent the arch from bending. The size of the arch has in turn helped to make Wembley Stadium stand out on the London landscape from either on the ground or up in the air.

Continuing round brings you to the East Stand.

The glass façade isn’t as present here, with large concrete slabs forming the stand’s base and large white panels making up most of the upper parts. Gate F (A Level 1 Gate and part of the Green Zone) can be found to the right of where the Wembley arch connects to the ground. Gate E (A Level 5 Gate and part of the Green Zone) can be found to the left of where the Wembley arch connects to the ground. Gate D (A Level 5 Gate and part of the Blue Zone which covers the southeastern side of Wembley Stadium) can be found to the left of Gate E. Gate C (A Level 1 Gate and part of the Blue Zone) can be found towards the stadium’s southeast corner. In addition, you can find the Club Wembley East Entrance to the right of Gate C.

At the far end of the concourse outside the East Stand are staircases that lead down to First Way and Atlantic Crescent. The East Service Gate is in place next to these roads, and the Pink Car Park is out beyond them along South Way (B4557).

Heading round from the East Stand brings you to the southeast corner.

Its exterior is similar to the northeast corner, using a mostly glass façade with white supporting pillars lower down to hold its upper parts in place. This side of Wembley Stadium holds Gate B (A Level 1 Gate and part of the Blue Zone).

At the far end of the concourse outside the southeast corner are road ramps which allow vehicles to head down to the roads that are near Wembley Stadium’s eastern side.

The exterior of the South Stand can essentially be split into two different types of segments.

One of these segments uses large concrete slabs at its base and has large silver panels forming its upper parts. The other type of segment has a more open base containing turnstiles, with a glass façade higher up that in some cases allows you to see inside. Gate A (A Level 5 Gate and part of the Blue Zone) can be found over towards the stadium’s southeast corner. Gate P (A Level 5 Gate and part of the Red Zone which covers the southwestern side of Wembley Stadium) can be found over towards the stadium’s southwest corner.

South Way (B4557) runs along outside the South Stand, with railway tracks a little further out beyond here.

The southwest corner follows a similar exterior design to the northeast and southeast corners, using a mostly glass façade with white supporting pillars lower down to holds its upper parts in place.

This side of Wembley Stadium holds Gate N (A Level 1 Gate and part of the Red Zone).

Out beyond this corner of the stadium, a little further along South Way (B4557) is the White Horse Square, White Horse Bridge and Wembley Stadium Station.

The exterior of the West Stand shares plenty of similarities with the East Stand opposite.

The glass façade isn’t as present here, with large concrete slabs forming the stand’s base and large white panels making up most of its upper parts. This side of the stadium is also where the other end of the Wembley arch connects to the ground. Gate M (A Level 1 Gate and part of the Red Zone) can be found near to the stadium’s southwest corner. Gate L (A Level 5 Gate and part of the Red Zone) can be found towards the centre of the West Stand. Gate K (A Level 5 Gate and part of the Yellow Zone which covers the northwestern side of Wembley Stadium) can be found to the right of where the Wembley arch connects to the ground. Gate J (A Level 1 Gate and part of the Yellow Zone) can be found to the left of where the Wembley arch connects to the ground. In addition to these gates, you can find the Club Wembley West Entrance to the left of Gate M.

The roads outside the West Stand concourse, Royal Route and Pacific Crescent, are accessible by a road ramp outside the stadium’s southwest corner. The West Service Gate is in place next to these roads. Heading west along Royal Route will bring you to the stadium’s Red Car Park.

The northwest corner looks similar to the other three corners, using a mostly glass façade with white supporting pillars lower down to holds its upper parts in place.

This side of Wembley Stadium olds Gate H (A Level 1 Gate and part of the Yellow Zone).

 

Heading round in a clockwise direction from here will bring you back in front of the North Stand and the Sir Bobby Moore Statue.

Inside the Stadium

The North Stand consists primarily of three tiers but includes all of the aforementioned Levels 1-5.

The bottom tier holds Level 1 and is the clear largest, containing entirely red seating. The bottom tier is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section up at the back, though you are freely able to get between the two. This smaller section at the back contains two press areas that are separated from one another by a few blocks of red seating in the middle. Flat platforms for disabled supporters to use are based in front of each press area. Wembley Stadium’s substitute benches and tunnel are based right down at the front of the lower tier, with the changing rooms housed inside the stadium itself.

The middle tier is the clear smallest of the three and hangs slightly over the bottom tier beneath. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between. These two sections form what is considered Level 2 for Club Wembley Members, with the Royal Box in place down at the front of the central blocks and flat platforms for disabled supporters further back to either side. The Royal Box is typically where players collect and lift their trophy following the conclusion of cup finals.

Directly behind the Level 2 seating blocks is a row of executive boxes that each have red seating in front of them. This row of executive boxes is considered Level 3 and is also for Club Wembley Members.

Stacked atop these executive boxes is another row of executive boxes. This row is considered Level 4, also for Club Wembley Members, and is only present within the North Stand and adjacent corners.

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row forming a wave-like pattern that is taller in the middle than at either end. You can find two flat platforms for disabled supporters to use here, and a row of translucent panels are in place behind the back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch.

Across all three tiers and all five levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the North Stand as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

The northeast corner continues the three-tiered design that is present in the North Stand.

The bottom tier (Level 1) is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section at the back, though you can freely get between the two. The main feature down however is the access tunnel that is in line with the pitch’s corner flag, and there is a flat platform for disabled supporters up above this.

The middle tier (Level 2) continues the design of the North Stand. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between. You can also find a flat platform here for disabled supporters to use.

Directly behind these Level 2 seating blocks is a row of executive boxes that each have red seating in front of them (Level 3).

Stacked atop these executive boxes is another row of executive boxes (Level 4).

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row noticeably lower down than the adjacent North Stand’s. There is a row of translucent panels in place behind this back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch.

Across all three tiers and all five levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the northeast corner as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

 

The East Stand isn’t as tall as the North Stand but still continues the three-tiered design that is present elsewhere.

The bottom tier (Level 1) is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section at the back, though you can freely get between the two. Seats within this tier are mostly red in colour, though the blocks in the larger section have the letters WEMBLEY spelt out in dark blue across them, with a sliver of white seating used to give each letter a 3D effect. There are three flat platforms for disabled supporters in place behind the letters M, B and L.

The middle tier (Level 2) continues the design of the North Stand and northeast corner. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between.

The East Stand does have executive boxes in place at the back of the middle tier (Level 3) but these are not present all the way along. This is because the centre of the East Stand contains a giant electronic screen that can best be seen by those at the opposite end of Wembley Stadium.

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row noticeably lower down than the adjacent North Stand’s. There is a row of translucent panels in place behind this back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch. It is also worth noting that the presence of the large electronic screen limits the number of seats in the central blocks of the top tier.

Across all three tiers and all four levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the East Stand as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

 

The southeast corner continues the three-tiered design that is present elsewhere.

The bottom tier (Level 1) is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section at the back, though you can freely get between the two. The main feature down here however is a small access tunnel that is in line with the pitch’s corner flag, and there is a flat platform for disabled supporters up above this.

The middle tier (Level 2) continues the design of the adjacent East Stand. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between. You can also find a flat platform here for disabled supporters to use.

Directly behind these Level 2 seating blocks is a row of executive boxes that each have red seating in front of them (Level 3).

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row noticeably lower down than the adjacent South Stand’s. There is a row of translucent panels in place behind this back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch.

Across all three tiers and all four levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the southeast corner as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

 

The South Stand shares some similarities with the North Stand opposite. It consists primarily of three tiers but only includes Levels 1, 2, 3 and 5.

The bottom tier (Level 1) and is the clear largest, containing entirely red seating. The bottom tier is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section up at the back, though you are freely able to get between the two. You can find a row of flat platforms along the back of the larger section which disabled supporters can use.

The middle tier (Level 2) is the clear smallest of the three and hangs slightly over the bottom tier beneath. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between.

Directly behind the Level 2 seating blocks is a row of executive boxes that each have red seating in front of them (Level 3).

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row forming a wave-like pattern that is taller in the middle than at either end. There is a row of translucent panels in place behind this back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch. You can find a large platform down at the front of the central blocks which holds the main matchday camera, and there is a flat platform for disabled supporters up behind it.

Across all three tiers and all four levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the South Stand as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

 

The southwest corner is near enough a carbon copy of the southeast corner, continuing the three-tiered design that is present elsewhere in Wembley Stadium.

The bottom tier (Level 1) is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section at the back, though you can freely get between the two. The main feature down here however is a small access tunnel that is in line with the pitch’s corner flag, and there is a flat platform for disabled supporters up above this.

The middle tier (Level 2) continues the design of the adjacent East Stand. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between. You can also find a flat platform here for disabled supporters to use.

Directly behind these Level 2 seating blocks is a row of executive boxes that each have red seating in front of them (Level 3).

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row noticeably lower down than the adjacent South Stand’s. There is a row of translucent panels in place behind this back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch.

Across all three tiers and all four levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the southeast corner as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

 

The West Stand is a carbon copy of the East Stand opposite, continuing the three-tiered design that is present elsewhere in Wembley Stadium.

The bottom tier (Level 1) is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section at the back, though you can freely get between the two. Seats within this tier are mostly red in colour, though the blocks in the larger section have the letters WEMBLEY spelt out in dark blue across them, with a sliver of white seating used to give each letter a 3D effect. There are three flat platforms for disabled supporters in place behind the letters M, B and L.

The middle tier (Level 2) continues the design of the South Stand and southwest corner. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between.

The West Stand does have executive boxes in place at the back of the middle tier (Level 3) but these are not present all the way along. This is because the centre of the West Stand contains a giant electronic screen that can best be seen by those at the opposite end of Wembley Stadium.

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row noticeably lower down than the adjacent South and North Stand’s. There is a row of translucent panels in place behind this back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch. It is also worth noting that the presence of the large electronic screen limits the number of seats in the central blocks of the top tier.

Across all three tiers and all four levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the West Stand as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

 

The northwest corner is near enough a carbon copy of the northeast corner, continuing the three-tiered design that is present elsewhere in Wembley Stadium.

The bottom tier (Level 1) is split into a much larger section at the front and a much smaller section at the back, though you can freely get between the two. The main feature down however is the access tunnel that is in line with the pitch’s corner flag, and there is a flat platform for disabled supporters up above this.

The middle tier (Level 2) continues the design of the adjacent West Stand. It consists of entirely red seating which is split into two sections that you can freely get between. You can also find a flat platform here for disabled supporters to use.

Directly behind these Level 2 seating blocks is a row of executive boxes that each have red seating in front of them (Level 3).

Stacked atop these executive boxes is another row of executive boxes (Level 4).

The top tier (Level 5) consists of entirely red seating, with its back row noticeably lower down than the adjacent North Stand’s. There is a row of translucent panels in place behind this back row that enables light to access the Wembley pitch.

Across all three tiers and all five levels, you are given a perfectly clear view of the pitch from inside the northwest corner as there are no supporting pillars in sight.

The enclosed design of Wembley Stadium in turn means that every row inside is fully protected from the elements.

Away Fans

With Wembley Stadium being a neutral venue used mostly for Cup Finals, the term away fans doesn’t really apply here that often.

 

Depending on the occasion and the teams involved, Wembley is known to be split almost 50/50 between the two sides. Each team is set up behind and around one of the two goals, with the more central seating blocks in the North and South Stand taken up by corporates (the amount normally varies in number and depends again on the occasion).

The smallest of crowds normally have just the bottom tier (Level 1) made available to them, with the middle tier (Level 2 and 3) made available for executives when necessary. In the most major games when Wembley Stadium is expected to be full, then the top tier (Level 5) is also made available to regular supporters.

For International fixtures, the majority of the crowd are England supporters, but there are away supporters permitted at the stadium. This away crowd is typically housed in the bottom tier of the East Stand, positioned behind the goal and given a perfectly clear view of the action taking place in front of them.

Matchday Pubs

Pubs available to supporters on a matchday include*:

-The Blue Check Café (12-13 Empire Way, HA9 0RQ) (Considered part of the East Side)

-The Blue Room (53 Wembley Hill Road, HA9 8BE) (Considered part of the West Side) (Located north of Wembley Stadium Station)

-The Corner House (313 Harrow Road, HA9 6BA) (Considered part of the West Side) (Located near Wembley Stadium Station)

- The Crock of Gold (23 Bridge Road, HA9 9AB) (Considered part of the East Side) (Located near to Wembley Park Underground Station)

-J.J. Moon’s (397 High Road, HA9 6AA) (A JD Wetherspoon Pub, Typically Home and Away Supporters) (Located near Wembley Central Station)

-OYO The Green Man Pub and Hotel (Dagmar Avenue, HA9 8DF) (Considered part of the West Side)

-Station 31 (299-303 Harrow Road, HA9 6BD) (Considered part of the West Side) (Located near Wembley Stadium Station)

-The Torch (1-5 Bridge Road, HA9 9AB) (Considered Part of the East Side) (Located near to Wembley Park Underground Station)

-The Wembley Tavern (121 Wembley Park Drive, HA9 8HG) (Considered part of the East Side)

*For Cup and Play-Off Final fixtures, police normally allocate specific pubs to each team’s supporters. Fans based on the eastern side of Wembley Stadium are given pubs to the north and east of stadium, and fans based on the western side of Wembley Stadium are given pubs to the south and west of the stadium.

Overview

It’s a site that dates back to the 1920s, and following a long reconstruction project in the 2000s, Wembley Stadium has become one of the most recognisable venues anywhere on Earth.

The home of English football is a magnificent all-seater venue, identifiable from miles around by its distinctive supporting arch (though admittedly the high buildings around Wembley Park do cause restrictions to the view of it in certain places).

Many of us have been lucky enough to see our team play here in the past, or even get the chance to play on the pitch ourselves, and many millions more continue to hope that their opportunity will come in the future.

There aren’t many other sporting venues out there that carry the reputation of Wembley Stadium.